The Architecture of Cloth, Colour and Space – The Woven Architectural Facade

In my second post leading up to the opening of my new exhibition I wanted to give you a sneak preview of my woven architectural facade drawings. When I was writing my thesis at the RCA in 1996 I chose to look more closely at the relationship between weaving, colour and architecture. I became fascinated and amazed by the parallels between woven cloth structure and the structure of buildings. Later on in 2005 I was invited by Selvedge Magazine to expand and update my thesis for one of their early issues. You can read the article here: 

 http://www.ptolemymann.com/pdf/journalism/structurally_sound_exposing_the_foundations.pdf

When I began in 2006 to work as a colour consultant my first appointment as lead artist was to specify the colours for the external facade of a hospital in Nottinghamshire called King’s Mill. A massive new build PFI, I was given a remarkably free hand by the Sherwood Forrest Trust to create an undulating colourful facade. A daunting task until I decided to treat it as I would a large-scale woven artwork using sheets of glass spandrel panels, render and powder coated metal instead of threads. From working on this project, and since then several others, I noticed how these architectural facades replicated a macro zoom into the structure of a cloth. For my show I have printed a series of six fine art prints of some of these projects, often removing the building itself, to create abstract visualizations illustrating these parallels.

These are A1 Limited edition prints and will be on sale. Please enquire for details.

Below are projects in conjunction with Swankye Hayden Connell Architects, Stanton Williams Architects and David Morely Architects.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PTOLEMY MANN – THE ARCHITECTURE OF CLOTH, COLOUR AND SPACE

Opens 18th November 2011 @ Ruthin Craft Centre

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About Ptolemy Mann

Ptolemy Mann is a textile artist, designer and architectural colour consultant
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